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The IRS has reminded taxpayers who are earning income from selling goods and/or providing services that they may receive Form 1099-K, Payment Card and Third-Party Network Transactions, for payment card transactions and third-party payment network transactions of more than $600 for the year.


Many taxpayers may be surprised in early 2023 when they receive a Form 1099-K, Payment Card and Third-Party Network Transactions, to report income earned in the “gig economy” or in sales of goods and services through certain internet sites. The number of taxpayers receiving the forms is expected to skyrocket because the threshold for reporting payments made through third-party processors has plummeted.


Beginning with their 2021 tax years, partnerships with "items of international tax relevance" must file Schedule K-2, Partners’ Distributive Share Items—International, and Schedule K-3, Partner’s Share of Income, Deductions, Credits, etc.—International.


The Tax Court set aside Notice 2017-10, 2017-4 I.R.B. 544, while adjudicating a series of consolidated cases involving limited liability companies (LLCs) and conservation easements, because it was improperly issued by the IRS without meeting the notice and comment requirements under the Administrative Procedure Act (APA).


The Department of the Treasury outlined how the Inflation Reduction Act’s tax incentives will support the building of an equitable clean energy economy.


The IRS-Criminal Investigation (IRS-CI) has released its Fiscal Year 2022 Annual Report. The report details statistics, important partnerships and significant criminal enforcement actions from IRS-CI, the criminal investigative arm of the IRS, for the past fiscal year, which began October 1, 2021 and ended September 30, 2022. Over 2,550 criminal investigations, the identification of more than $31 billion from tax fraud and financial crimes, and a 90.6 percent conviction rate are just a few highlights of the report.


Changes made by the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 ( P.L. 117-169) are reflected in draft forms and instructions


The Internal Revenue Service is estimating the tax gap on tax years 2014-2016 to be $496 billion, an increase of more than $58 billion from the prior estimate.


Former Internal Revenue Service Commissioner Charles Rettig used his farewell message to highlight the work the agency’s workforce did during his four-year term as commissioner, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic, but also during more normal times.


You have just been notified that your tax return is going to be audited ... what now? While the best defense is always a good offense (translation: take steps to avoid an audit in the first place), in the event the IRS does come knocking on your door, here are some basic guidelines you can follow to increase the chances that you will come out of your audit unscathed.


Employers are required by the Internal Revenue Code to calculate, withhold, and deposit with the IRS all federal employment taxes related to wages paid to employees. Failure to comply with these requirements can find certain "responsible persons" held personally liable. Who is a responsible person for purposes of employment tax obligations? The broad interpretation defined by the courts and the IRS may surprise you.


Q. I have a professional services firm and am considering hiring my wife to help out with some of the administrative tasks in the office. I don't think we'll have a problem working together but I would like to have more information about the tax aspects of such an arrangement before I make the leap. What are some of the tax advantages of hiring my spouse?


Q. Each year when it comes time to prepare my return, I realize how little I think about my tax situation during the rest of the year. I seem to lack any sort of common sense when it comes to dealing with my taxes. Do you have any general advice for people like me trying to "do the right thing" in any tax situation that may arise during the year?


All of us will, at one time or another, incur financial losses - whether insubstantial or quite significant -- in our business and personal lives. When business fortunes head South -- either temporarily or in a more prolonged slide, it is important to be aware of how the tax law can limit the actual amount of your losses and your ability to deduct them. Here are some of the types of losses your business may experience and the related tax considerations to keep in mind in the event of a business downturn.


Fringe benefits to employees often provide the "sizzle" to keep them aboard during times of high employment. One increasingly popular benefit -- from the perspective of both employees and employers alike -- comes in the form of "qualified transportation fringe benefits." Set up properly, this fringe benefit arrangement can fund a substantial portion of an employee's commuting expenses with either pre-tax dollars or tax-free employer-provided benefits.